One of the most beautiful....

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Conchiolin
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One of the most beautiful....

Post by Conchiolin » Fri Sep 21, 2007 5:45 pm

Look at this moth! It's been a long time since i saw such a beauty!! I found other 2 species of moths and again i never found them in any book.

Any ideas? Awaiting the experts.
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HPIM4172.JPG
Nice moth. Damage on the right wing but still, It's beautiful!
HPIM4172.JPG (90.73 KiB) Viewed 36757 times
HPIM4147.JPG
Nice coloration. Could somebody point out the name of the plant on which the moth is feeding. Photo is a bit blurry but i have better photos of it.
HPIM4147.JPG (64.41 KiB) Viewed 36757 times
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Post by MWP admin » Sun Sep 23, 2007 12:07 am

Yes they are really nice indeed, esp the first one (though a bit out of focus!) which must be somehow rare. We wait jonagius comments! Good job!
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Post by IL-PINE » Sun Sep 23, 2007 8:43 am

On looking on the book of butterflies, the 2nd photo might be Drysonia torrida but I have never seen anything like both of these. Good photos, and keep up the interest Conchiolin!

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Post by Conchiolin » Sun Sep 23, 2007 8:12 pm

Thanks! I googled that species but i found nothing. Pine can you id the moths in the other post using that book? thanks.
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Post by Davdand » Mon Sep 24, 2007 2:18 pm

Hi, I just joined the forum which I find most interesting.

The first moth is Uthetheisa pulchella, Fam.Arctiidae. It was previously very common but is now quite scarce. The plant it is on is Heliotropum europaeum, the Common Heliotrope, M. Ghobbejra. This is the foodplant of this moth's caterpillar.

The second moth is Dysgonia torrida (Not Drysonia which is why you couldn't google it!) Fam. Noctuidae. M. Bahrija tar-Rignu Afrikana. It could also be D. algira, which is very similar. Foodplants include Ricinus (castor oil plant) and Punica (pomegranate)

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Post by MWP admin » Mon Sep 24, 2007 2:45 pm

Thank You so much davdand :notworthy:

ps: should it be Utetheisa pulchella ? (according to internet)
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Post by Davdand » Mon Sep 24, 2007 5:09 pm

You're right :? it should be Utetheisa.

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Post by Conchiolin » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:34 am

Thanks Mr.davidand. That explains why i found the other moth under our pomegranate tree so it's probably is the algira.
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U. pulchella & D. algira

Post by jonagius » Wed Sep 26, 2007 8:21 pm

Hi people,

Sorry for being late. Davdand identified both species correctly. :o GREAT!!.

From this post onwards I will start giving a brief summary of the moths/butterflies you photograph. Like this it would be more interesting for you to notice these insects in the wild, and hopefully even making some scientific discoveries. If you want to send your comments, critics and/or suggestions, please feel free to do so.

Species: Utetheisa pulchella (Linnaeus, 1758)
Family: Arctiidae
Subfamily: Arctiinae
Common Name: Crimson-speckled Moth
Flight period: Sep - Oct in 1 generation. Occasionally I have also reported it in May.
Distribution: Across all Europe, Northern Africa, Canary Islands, Madeira, Asia through Japan.
Local status: As correctly stated by Davdand, it was a common moth which now is difficult to meet. However it is also a very strong migrant and in some years (eg. Sep 2006) it was extremely common.
Larval foodplants: Heliotropum europaeum and Borago officinalis
Similar species: None in Europe

Species: Dysgonia algira (Linnaeus, 1767)
Family: Noctuidae
Subfamily: Catocalinae
Common Name: The Passenger
Flight period: Apr - Oct up to 3 generations depending on weather conditions.
Distribution: Mediterranean-Asiatic, including North Africa.
Local status: Quite common but normally localised.
Larval foodplants: Rubus ulmifolius, Salix, Genista, Lythrum, Punica, Ricinus and Parietaria.
Similar species: Dysgonia torrida which is rarer. For the untrained eye, the main distinguishing feature between D. algira and D. torrida is the central fascia (band) on the forewings. The bands of D. torrida tend to curve slightly smoother than those of D. algira. I have bred both species for some years and have released a good number of specimens in the wild. So hopefully these beauties could be met more frequently. I am attaching a sketch of the forewings of both species to help you in the identification just in case you meet any of the species again.
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Post by IL-PINE » Thu Sep 27, 2007 10:04 am

wow!

Thanks, experts :)

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Post by Conchiolin » Thu Sep 27, 2007 10:20 am

Sooo pro...
Hell now that's interesting. You actually breeds those moths? Woow something i never even dreamed of. You have a special place for them "Mothery" or something?

I'm starting to like those Lepidopterans.

Thanky you Jonagius and Davdand. :)
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Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 27, 2007 11:33 am

Also a special thanks from the Admin for boosting the interess in these sections, which have been rather dormant for long.

THANKS
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jackpot
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Post by jackpot » Thu Sep 27, 2007 12:24 pm

is there someone who has a name & pic of the moth in flowerheads of Palaeocyanus? :help:

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Post by jonagius » Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:36 pm

Hi Conchiolin,

Yes, there are breeding cages made from light soft nets for these things. Glass jars are sometimes useful as well, as long as there are holes in the lid to allow the air inside the jar to go in and out. However, the most important thing in breeding insects is patience.

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Post by Conchiolin » Fri Sep 28, 2007 3:55 pm

Very interesting hobby that is. Yes i think you must have loads of patience to provide food and how to handle those delicate majestic creatures.
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