Looks edible ! ! !

Forum dedicated to Ornamental plants, such as those found in Public gardens, houses, terraces, etc. Also include cultivated species such as those for agriculture or any other commercial use

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Looks edible ! ! !

Post by MWP admin » Tue Nov 14, 2006 4:45 pm

Met this big fruit, looking like some hanging fruit of an egg plant.
What plant is it, and is it edible??

At the background there are leaves of Plumbago auriculata, so don't get confused.

Probably it's something found only as an ornamental cultivar.
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Post by RB » Tue Nov 14, 2006 6:23 pm

Stephanotis, nothing to eat inside there , there are fluffy wind dispersed seeds inside.

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Post by robcar » Tue Nov 14, 2006 8:05 pm

Pity - as MWP said - it does look very edible :(

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Post by MWP admin » Tue Nov 14, 2006 10:13 pm

Thanks guys !
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Post by Sdravko » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:17 pm

yes, stephanotis. although even i dont regard it as edible i found in a book a note that the abos in australia roast and eat the unripe fruit. but from that book it became obvious that they subside on such terrible plants that even i would starve in australia.

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Post by IL-PINE » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:19 pm

Stephanotis! We used to have a very large climber covering half of the garden's wall. It used to produce these large fruits hanging around! Then once upon a time came Sdravko's axe...... :(

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Post by Sdravko » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:26 pm

im innocent, im innocent. :crybaby: to my knowledge s is not invasive in Malta so i spared it.

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Post by Sdravko » Tue Nov 14, 2006 11:28 pm

hey, thought this was about WILD plants. didnt we have a forum about ornamentals?

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Post by RB » Wed Nov 15, 2006 10:27 am

I think we should have a cookery section...

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Post by jackpot » Thu Nov 16, 2006 2:05 pm

Stephanotis floribunda Brongn. is the Madagascar Jasmine (Bridal Wreath, Bridal Bouquet (Maltese: Stefanotis)
Family: Asclepiadaceae, the Milkweed family, but recently Apocynaceae, subfam. Asclepiadoideae).

More information?
The Madagascar Jasmine is an evergreen, medium sized, twining shrub, to 3-5 m tall. Thick, glossy and leathery dark green leaves are elliptic and 5-10 cm long.
Waxy white, 3 to 6 star-shaped flowers are developed in cymes. Flowers are 3-6 cm long and highly fragrant.

More information?
Stephanotis floribunda is native to Madagascar. Because the flower scent is strongly reminiscent of the Jasmines, plants became cultivated as ornamentals, growing as a controllable vine indoors in pots, or outside as a patio plant, requiring a trellis.
In some regions it is common to use the flowers in wedding corsages or bridal bouquets. Madagascar Jasmine is becoming popular in Malta, covering walls and fences of private gardens (e.g. High Ridge, Madliena). Plants perform well in full sun or partial shade, the soil should be moist during the growing season. Plants should be pruned regularly in early spring to encourage flowering.

:D

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Nov 16, 2006 2:34 pm

WOW looks we have a preview of some new book !

Thank you very much, interesting facts!
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Post by IL-PINE » Thu Nov 16, 2006 4:11 pm

Indeed a new book seems to be on the way :P

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Post by RB » Thu Nov 16, 2006 5:18 pm

Small correction "becoming" popular - No, it has been popular for many many years now, I always remember this plant in many places.

In fact if anything possibly due to greater choice of plants today it is used less than it was before, it tends to grow extremely fast and can look ugly if not attended after some years, and many people just chop the old plants completely when it gets to this stage.

I know, I did this, :twisted: due to restructuring of some building, but still from the remaining 30cm of stem, after quite a few months it rose from the dead.

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Nov 16, 2006 6:52 pm

God should have implemented the regeneration gene to the homo sapiens. At least for hair :lol:
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Post by jackpot » Fri Nov 17, 2006 12:41 pm

thanks RB for correction "becoming" popular...
It is not to late for corrections :wink:

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