Bamboo for Glimbo

Forum dedicated to Ornamental plants, such as those found in Public gardens, houses, terraces, etc. Also include cultivated species such as those for agriculture or any other commercial use

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RB
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Bamboo for Glimbo

Post by RB » Tue Jan 08, 2008 6:26 pm

Follow up from the RAT thread thought it more relevant to place this here.

Here's the pic of the bamboo, not too brilliant so let us know if you can ID this notwithstanding.

RB
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Glimbo
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:)

Post by Glimbo » Wed Jan 09, 2008 5:21 pm

Hi RB,

Not a Bamboo but a reed although I couldn't say which - maybe (as you say it looks like the florists' plant, C. papyrus - often used here in the floristry trade and sold as 'curly bamboo' - which it isn't.

To tell if you have a bamboo, run your fingers gently up and down the stem. You will find that you can feel a very obvious knuckle at the point of the leaf nodes, also you'll see that the auricles are slightly to obviously hirsuit, and that the leaf sheaths are discrete to each node, rather than running up the stem - like the ' grasses' per se.

I'll try and put a pic. of some of my bamboos on sometime.

happy ratting
glimbo

Glimbo
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although..................

Post by Glimbo » Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:18 pm

I looked at your photo' in close up and you could have a bamber :? does it answer the description vis. feel of the stem? also do you have any root attached? glimbo

RB
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Post by RB » Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:51 pm

It's very definitely a bamboo, like I said unfortunately the pic and the subject are not too hot.

The clump was pushing out new growth probably around 15ft tall and over 3cm thick at the lower parts.

The samples in the pic were taken from older, branching growth.

RB

Glimbo
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Post by Glimbo » Wed Jan 09, 2008 6:52 pm

Good grief! some 'senior moment' that was. Yes, bamboo, maybe a Phyllostachys does it have a glaucus bloom around the area of the knuckle? how does the stem feel?

poor old plant though! are you going to pot it up?

glimbo

RB
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Post by RB » Wed Jan 09, 2008 7:03 pm

I think that some better photos of the plant in situ would be more useful, maybe MWP will track it down and work his photographic magic...

Those are actually cuttings, but having read up I note that it may not be easy to propagate in this manner - or rather it depends greatly on the particular species.

I read that some species may actually root, and survive, with the culm even branching, but never produce a rhizome and thus the plant will just "exist" until it dies of old age.

RB

Glimbo
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Propping bamboo

Post by Glimbo » Wed Jan 09, 2008 9:43 pm

To propagate successfully.
You need to excavate part of the rootball - as you say, having selected a part of the plant with healthy rhizomes . You can tell the rhizome growth from actual culm growth because the culms grow straight and thick from big fat shoots at the base of the clump, whilst the rhizome growth is weak and spindly.

Take a vine saw with you, long-handled pruners and secateurs, of coarse, as well as excavating tools - a fork and VERY sharp spade are useful.

You'll need to cut away the portion of the rootball and rhizomes that you want to keep - c larger portion obviously - because you're bound to get die-back.

If you decide to do this, you'll need to do some TLC, but bamboo is generally pretty rugged and if you slowly start to nurture this you'll end up with a specimen to be proud of.

I can give you any prop help you might need.

On the other subject that you raised, of the behaviour of the culms - bamboo is generally quite difficult to kill, witness the piece you have there, it WILL die if it 's overstressed eg, caught spray drift, been starved,died of drought.

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Jan 10, 2008 10:13 am

Glimbo the Bamboo girl ! :P

Thanks for the info, the forum is getting really a good source of all tyes of info.
Stephen Mifsud
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Glimbo
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Post by Glimbo » Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:17 pm

they call me Pandawoman. lol. .............a bamboo in distress!!!! ......let me find a potting shed to change in.......lmao

glimbo

RB
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Post by RB » Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:41 pm

Thanks Glimbo, didn't know you were female (not that it makes much difference) but in some way one tends to personify online contacts unconsciously. In Malta you would be a "Glimba" therefore :-D .

Thanks for the info, I was not really prepared to go to the trouble as I do have enough subject matter to keep me busy, but if I see any particulaly willing rhizomes I may just yank at them.

Tell me about these large grasses being tough to kill. I'm trying to clear up some Arundo, digging not an option, and they seem to thrive on Roundup!

RB

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arundo

Post by Glimbo » Sun Jan 13, 2008 1:53 pm

No worries glimbawise. lol. I tend to think of internet personas as being androgenous anyway.- :-D


am going to go to Cultivation thread re Arundo
g 8)

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