A Cactus, not Opuntia

Forum dedicated to Ornamental plants, such as those found in Public gardens, houses, terraces, etc. Also include cultivated species such as those for agriculture or any other commercial use

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A Cactus, not Opuntia

Post by MWP admin » Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:06 pm

Maybe only RB can answer me on this Cactus. Genus is enough then i make my own rsearch from there.
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Post by D. Cilia » Sat Nov 24, 2007 4:36 pm

Is that from St Philip Gardens at Floriana?

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Post by IL-PINE » Sat Nov 24, 2007 5:40 pm

looks like an Euphorbia

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Post by MWP admin » Sat Nov 24, 2007 7:29 pm

Hmmm. this is close
http://www.hireplants.com/plants/euphor ... actus.html

From the shape I immediately took it forth granted to be a Cactus but now, on a closer examination, those that at first I thought to be spines, now appear to be veg. bodies! There is always to learn on ornamentals!
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Post by jackpot » Mon Nov 26, 2007 10:13 am

possibly Austrocylindropuntia subulata

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ORNAMENTAL GARDENS.

Post by ROLCAM » Mon Nov 26, 2007 10:37 am

Ornamental gardens. There are various kinds of ornamental gardens. They differ in the types of plants grown and in the way the plants are arranged. The most common ornamental gardens include (1) container gardens, (2) formal flower gardens, (3) informal flower gardens, (4) rock gardens, (5) water gardens, and (6) wild flower gardens. Some of these gardens may include grass, shrubs, and trees in addition to the plants mentioned in the following descriptions.

Container gardens. Begonias, geraniums, fuchsias, petunias, and many other plants can be grown outdoors in containers. The choice is almost limitless. But different plants require different amounts of care. The containers themselves may be immovable, such as window boxes, or movable, such as flowerpots. Containers come in a wide range of materials, sizes, shapes, and prices. But many gardeners build their own containers or use items found in the home, such as tubs or crocks. A container garden can thus be as easy to care for and as inexpensive as a gardener wishes.

Formal flower gardens consist of flower beds laid out in balanced and regular patterns. Generally, the edges of the beds are straight or perfectly rounded. The beds contain only a few kinds of flowers, which grow to a similar height and shape. Formal flower gardens need not be expensive to cultivate. But they require the constant care of a skilled gardener to keep them neat and orderly.

Informal flower gardens have one or more beds of flowers laid out in a casual and irregular manner. The edges of the beds may be unevenly curved, and each bed may have several kinds of flowers, which vary widely in height and shape. A simple flower garden is fairly inexpensive and easy to care for.

Rock gardens consist of plants grown in pockets of soil among rocks. On their property, some people have a natural rock arrangement, which they use to create such a garden. Other people build an artificial rock garden, which can be a costly and difficult project. Any plants that require little soil can be planted in a rock garden. A rock garden may be hard to care for because of its uneven surface.

Water gardens. A water garden consists of a body of water, usually a pool, in which plants that live in water are grown. Some homeowners have a natural body of water on their property and use it to create a water garden. However, most people who want a water garden must either purchase a ready-made pool or build a pool themselves. Construction of a water garden can be expensive and difficult, but a completed garden needs little care.

Wild flower gardens are made up of native wild flowers. Such a garden can be inexpensive and easy to grow. Many gardeners dig up wild flowers or collect the seeds in the countryside for their garden. But such flowers and seeds can also be bought.
Roland Camilleri B.Ec. FCPA.

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Post by RB » Tue Dec 04, 2007 2:13 am

Oh it's a cactus allright, no Euphorbia. Related to Opuntia, but hey, I think Jackpot has it perfect.

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Post by MWP admin » Tue Dec 04, 2007 10:53 pm

Thanks very much guys. At first I thought that it is too much ornamental for my tastes, but I found some casual escapes in the wild (well not far away from a country house). Will soon post a photo since not sure if they are the same plant. Too tired now!
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Post by MWP admin » Sat Dec 08, 2007 5:19 pm

Here are some casual escapes of what I assume to be the same - Austrocylindropuntia subulata

Hope you confirm!
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Post by jackpot » Tue Dec 11, 2007 5:12 pm

yes

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Post by MWP admin » Sat Dec 15, 2007 11:38 am

:thumbleft:
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