Easy Asphodelaceae

Forum dedicated to Ornamental plants, such as those found in Public gardens, houses, terraces, etc. Also include cultivated species such as those for agriculture or any other commercial use

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Easy Asphodelaceae

Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:29 pm

I am trying to identify these two cults of the Asphodel family and my id is Aloe saponaria for the lower one and Aloe ferrox for the higher one?
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Post by RB » Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:47 pm

Top ones should be aloe vera

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:49 pm

lower ones as stated ?
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Post by jackpot » Thu Sep 13, 2007 3:42 pm

confirm RB, together with Crithmum (?), Inula, Capparis, Carpobrotus & possibly a yellow flowering variety of Aloe ferox (in front)

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 13, 2007 4:41 pm

And Dittrichia viscosa by the wall!

So Aloe vera (back) and Aloe saponaria (front). Thanks.
BTW, this was from a cemetry, and there where also large specimens of Pancratium maritimum with fruit having a size of a small-sized egg.
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Post by jackpot » Thu Sep 13, 2007 5:06 pm

no doubt with A. vera, but ok, ferox could be saponaria (I prefer ferox)

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Post by jackpot » Thu Sep 13, 2007 5:11 pm

I missed Dittrichia?
Interesting cemetery- but it is prohibited to make pics! :shock:
:)

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Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 13, 2007 5:32 pm

Ooops, I miscalled the taxon - I am ref to Inula crithmoides. I always mess these summer these two up!


Here's the chapel from the cemetry (a very small one)
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Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 13, 2007 5:33 pm

Is Aloe saponaria and A. ferox the same (synonyms) ??
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Post by MWP admin » Thu Sep 13, 2007 6:56 pm

So here is an Aloe vera naturalised on the coast!
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Post by jackpot » Fri Sep 14, 2007 8:43 am

no- 2 diff. sp.

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Post by RB » Fri Sep 14, 2007 9:07 am

Actually I am of the impression that Aloe vera was originally not naturalised but a native plant. However it is likely that due to collection of this plant for its properties, it likely died out as a "true" wild plant, and possibly the ones that one finds wild (such as at Cirkewwa) may originally have been planted.

I think there is a thread about this plant on the forum.

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Post by RB » Fri Sep 14, 2007 9:12 am

And BTW you were in Kalkara/Rinella...

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Post by MWP admin » Fri Sep 14, 2007 10:43 am

The plant is tought to be an archaeophyte (has been on our islands from ancient times) but the photo taken is a naturalised one, and those singular specimen scattered around on the coast are in my opinion all naturalised. A true native population of Aloe vera should consist of hundreds (or thousands) of plants close to each other.
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