FAUNA and FUNGHI of MALTA
(www.MaltaFauna.com)
Aedes albopictus  (Skuse, 1894)
Main synonym = Culex albopictus    Skuse, 1895
Taxonomical Classification:  Animalia / Arthropoda / Insecta / Diptera / Culicidae
Tiger mosquito, Forest day mosquito     Maltese name not known
Further Information:
Aedes albopictus is characterized by its black and white striped legs, and small black and white striped body. It is native to the tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia; however, in the past couple of decades this species has invaded many countries throughout the world through the transport of goods and increasing international travel. This mosquito has become a significant pest in many communities because it closely associates with humans (rather than living in wetlands), and typically flies and feeds in the daytime in addition to at dusk and dawn. The insect is called a tiger mosquito because its striped appearance is similar to that of a tiger.

Aedes albopictus is an epidemiologically important vector for the transmission of many viral pathogens, including the Yellow fever virus, dengue fever and Chikungunya fever, as well as several filarial nematodes such as Dirofilaria immitis. Aedes albopictus is one of the 100 world's worst invasive species according to the Global Invasive Species Database. Aedes albopictus has proven to be very difficult to suppress or to control due to their remarkable ability to adapt to various environments, their close contact with humans, and their reproductive biology (from Wikipedia).












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